Ketorolac Tromethamine Nasal spray, solution

What is this medicine?

KETOROLAC (kee toe ROLE ak) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used for a short while to treat moderate to severe pain, including pain after surgery. It should not be used for more than 5 days.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bleeding disorders

  • cigarette smoker

  • drink more than 3 alcohol-containing drinks a day

  • heart disease

  • high blood pressure

  • history of stomach bleeding

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • lung or breathing disease, like asthma

  • stomach or intestine problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ketorolac, aspirin, other NSAIDs, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for use in the nose. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. This medicine is not approved for use in children.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you've taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • cidofovir

  • methotrexate

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • pentoxifylline

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • alprazolam

  • carbamazepine

  • certain medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin, enoxaparin, and dalteparin

  • diuretics

  • flavocoxid

  • fluoxetine

  • garlic

  • ginger

  • ginkgo

  • lithium

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • muscle relaxants

  • phenytoin

  • thiothixene

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your pain does not go away, if it gets worse, or if you have new or a different type of pain.

Do not take other medicines that contain aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen with this medicine. Side effects such as stomach upset, nausea, or ulcers may be more likely to occur. Many medicines available without a prescription should not be taken with this medicine.

This medicine does not prevent heart attack or stroke. In fact, this medicine may increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. The chance may increase with longer use of this medicine and in people who have heart disease. If you take aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke, talk with your doctor or health care professional.

This medicine can cause ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines at any time during treatment. This can happen with no warning and may cause death. There is increased risk with taking this medicine for a long time. Smoking, drinking alcohol, older age, and poor health can also increase risks. Call your doctor right away if you have stomach pain or blood in your vomit or stool.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • black, tarry stools

  • breathing problems

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain or chest tightness

  • confusion, trouble speaking or understanding

  • dark urine

  • nausea, vomiting

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • right upper belly pain

  • sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg

  • trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination

  • unexplained weight gain

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (Report these to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome.):

  • diarrhea

  • dizziness

  • headache

  • heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store unopened bottles of this medicine in the refrigerator between 2 and 8 degrees C (36 and 46 degrees F). After opening, store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away open bottles within 24 hours of opening. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

What is this medicine?

KETOROLAC (kee toe ROLE ak) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This eye drop is used to treat pain and swelling after eye surgery. It is also used to decrease swelling or redness caused by allergies.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bleeding problems

  • contact lenses

  • diabetes mellitus

  • dry eye syndrome, other eye problems, or recent eye surgery

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ketorolac, aspirin, other NSAIDs, other medicines, foods, dyes or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is only for use in the eye. Do not take by mouth. Remove contact lenses before use. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Wash hands before and after use. Tilt your head back slightly and pull your lower eyelid down with your index finger to form a pouch. Try not to touch the tip of the dropper to your eye, fingertips, or any other surface. Use 1 bottle for each eye after eye surgery in both eyes. Do not use the same bottle for both eyes. Squeeze the prescribed number of drops into the pouch. Close the eye gently to spread the drops. Your vision may blur for a few minutes. Use your doses at regular intervals. Do not use your medicine more often than directed. For smaller, single-use vials, throw away each vial after use.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • corticosteroid eye drops or ointments such as dexamethasone

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin

Do not use any other eye products without asking your doctor or health care professional.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your eye symptoms do not get better within 2 to 3 days. Do not use for longer than directed by your doctor or health care professional.

You should not wear contact lenses while you are using this medicine, unless your doctor or health care professional tells you to.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • bleeding in the white part of your eye

  • sores in the eye or eye irritation that gets worse

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • blurred vision

  • burning or stinging after instilling the drops

  • dry eyes

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store this medicine at room temperature between 15 and 25 degrees C (59 and 77 degrees F). Protect from light. If single-use vials are supplied in foil pouches, store vials in the pouch with the pouch ends closed. For standard size vials, throw away any unused eye solution one month after opening. For smaller, single-use vials, throw away each vial after use, and throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

What is this medicine?

KETOROLAC (kee toe ROLE ak) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used for a short while to treat moderate to severe pain, including pain after surgery. It should not be used for more than 5 days.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems like hemophilia

  • cigarette smoker

  • drink more than 3 alcohol containing drinks a day

  • heart disease or circulation problems such as heart failure or leg edema (fluid retention)

  • high blood pressure

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • stomach bleeding or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ketorolac, aspirin, other NSAIDs, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a full glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not take more than the recommended dose.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 16 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • cidofovir

  • methotrexate

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • alprazolam

  • carbamazepine

  • cyclosporine

  • diuretics

  • flavocoxid

  • fluoxetine

  • ginkgo

  • lithium

  • medicines for high blood pressure like enalapril

  • medicines that affect platelets like pentoxifylline

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like heparin, warfarin

  • muscle relaxants

  • phenytoin

  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone

  • thiothixene

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your pain does not get better. Talk to your doctor before taking another medicine for pain. Do not treat yourself.

This medicine does not prevent heart attack or stroke. In fact, this medicine may increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. The chance may increase with longer use of this medicine and in people who have heart disease. If you take aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke, talk with your doctor or health care professional.

Do not take medicines such as ibuprofen and naproxen with this medicine. Side effects such as stomach upset, nausea, or ulcers may be more likely to occur. Many medicines available without a prescription should not be taken with this medicine.

This medicine can cause ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines at any time during treatment. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol. These increase irritation to your stomach and can make it more susceptible to damage from this medicine. Ulcers and bleeding can happen without warning symptoms and can cause death.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells.

This medicine can cause you to bleed more easily. Try to avoid damage to your teeth and gums when you brush or floss your teeth.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • high blood pressure

  • nausea, vomiting

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • severe stomach pain

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • signs and symptoms of a stroke like changes in vision; confusion; trouble speaking or understanding; severe headaches; sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg; trouble walking; dizziness; loss of balance or coordination

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unexplained weight gain or swelling

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dizziness

  • headache

  • heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

What is this medicine?

KETOROLAC (kee toe ROLE ak) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used to treat moderate to severe pain for up to 5 days. It is commonly used after surgery. This medicine should not be used for more than 5 days.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • asthma, especially aspirin-sensitive asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • kidney disease

  • stomach bleed, ulcer, or other problem

  • taking aspirin, other NSAID, or probenecid

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ketorolac, tromethamine, aspirin, other NSAIDs, other medicines, foods, dyes or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection into a muscle or into a vein. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 2 years old for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • cidofovir

  • methotrexate

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pentoxifylline

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • alprazolam

  • carbamazepine

  • diuretics

  • flavocoxid

  • fluoxetine

  • ginkgo

  • lithium

  • medicines for blood pressure like enalapril

  • medicines that affect platelets like pentoxifylline

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like heparin, warfarin

  • muscle relaxants

  • pemetrexed

  • phenytoin

  • thiothixene

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

This medicine does not prevent heart attack or stroke. In fact, this medicine may increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. The chance may increase with longer use of this medicine and in people who have heart disease. If you take aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke, talk with your doctor or health care professional.

Do not take medicines such as ibuprofen and naproxen with this medicine. Side effects such as stomach upset, nausea, or ulcers may be more likely to occur. Many medicines available without a prescription should not be taken with this medicine.

This medicine can cause ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines at any time during treatment. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol. These increase irritation to your stomach and can make it more susceptible to damage from this medicine. Ulcers and bleeding can happen without warning symptoms and can cause death.

This medicine can cause you to bleed more easily. Try to avoid damage to your teeth and gums when you brush or floss your teeth.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • high blood pressure

  • nausea, vomiting

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • severe stomach pain

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • signs and symptoms of a blood clot changes in vision; chest pain; severe, sudden headache; trouble speaking; sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unexplained weight gain or swelling

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dizziness

  • headache

  • heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.